International Symposium at Glastonbury Abbey and Harvard University Divinity School (June 6-9, 2013)
Sponsored by the Harvard University Divinity School, the Center for Health and Global Environment at the Harvard School of Public Health ,the Harvard
University Center for the Environment, the North Carolina State University School of Design, and the Forum for Architecture, Culture and Spirituality
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Program

The Urbanism, Spirituality and Wellbeing Symposium began on Thursday afternoon June 6th with a welcome, paper sessions and an evening keynote address, followed on Friday by peer-reviewed paper sessions and a keynote address. Thursday and Friday programs were conducted at the Glastonbury Abbey. On Saturday, the symposium was conducted at the Harvard Divinity School and included invited speakers and panel discussions by leading experts in the field. Sunday morning unfolded at Glastonbury Abbey and include the ACS business meeting and a concluding session. The meeting came to a close at noon that Sunday. As in the past, we shared our meals, had time for early meditation and quiet evening retreat (if desired), and encouraged casual conversations among participants.

Click this link for the Symposium Program


NOTE: The USW Symposium started with two lectures preparing the ground for the three-day long meeting in June. These two lectures were :

Reflections on the Past (delivered on April 11 at Harvard University Science Center —Lecture Hall E) . The focus of this first lecture on the history of cities planned according to spiritual motivations or principles. Cities in which ecological sustainability and spiritual well-being have enjoyed historical or ongoing reciprocity are of greatest interest. Click here to know more.
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Contemporary Trends (May 2 at Harvard University Fong Auditorium —Boylston Hall) . The focus of this first lecture onthe contribution of spiritual motivations in planning contemporary cities and, specifically, the use of design to support spiritual engagement and environmental health in the public realm. Click here to know more.
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For further information about these two events, follow this link.